A Clockwork Orange

Image(The Jameson Rating: 90% An excellent controversial film that makes us concerned for the future. State of the art British acting and a concept so bizarre it’s intriguing.) Very rarely we ask ourselves the question as to who we really are and what our purpose is. When we look very deep into the answer, the results are puzzling and frankly, a little terrifying. Whether or not we make our own decisions, in regards to if we truly have free will or not, or if our decisions are already made or destined to be upon us, is a difficult understanding. Are our choices really our choices, or are they determined based on our genetics and past experiences? These are actually a little scary to think about, because we may never find out. For all we know, we could be brainwashed zombies, programmed by the government. As is the case in Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 adaptation of the Anthony Burgess novel, “A Clockwork Orange”. A government organization brainwashes criminal Alex free of his own choices and decisions. He is left with a sick feeling every time he has an urge to perform violent acts. Alex is left with the decision to either still act violently, or live how the government wants him to. Should he still rage, Alex will suffer horribly, so he really has little choice.

Pulp Fiction

Image(The Jameson Rating: 95% A brilliant, brilliant movie. The concept of time, the characters, the plot, the dialogue; all magnificent. Having been written and directed by Quentin Tarantino makes it an absolute treat.) The famed Ancient Greek philosopher Socrates, left behind one of the greatest legacies ever to exist. With his views on government, ethics, and his extreme criticism, Socrates has given us all a different view on… everything. One of the legacies he is most well known for is that he developed what is referred to Socratic Dialogue. It is the very reason why people loved him, and the same as to why people hated him. It involved repeatedly asking questions, after not being satisfied with the answers given. A painful, yet clever conversation method, it can drive the other to madness while he smiles pleasantly. The form of communication is used¬† today by philosophy enthusiasts and young bothersome children. It can sometimes be seen in forms of literature, or in the case of Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction”; movies. Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta play two hit men that have a wide array of strange conversation topics. Unintentionally, Samuel L. Jackson’s character Jules Winnfield carries through a conversation with John Travolta’s Vincent Vega in a form of communication similar to a Socratic Dialogue. Please be aware that there is some coarse language.

[JULES]
Okay so, tell me again about the hash bars.
[VINCENT]
Okey what do you want to know?
[JULES]
Well, hash is legal over there, right?
[VINCENT]
Yeah,It’s legal but it ain’t hundred percent legal, I mean, you just can’t walk into a restaurant,
roll a joint and start puffin’ away. They want you to smoke in your home or certain designated places.
[JULES]
And those are the hash bars?
[VINCENT]
Yeah, It breaks down like this, ok, it’s legal to buy it, it’s legal to own it,
And if you’re the proprietor of a hash bar, it’s legal to sell it.
It’s legal to carry it, but…but that dosen’t matter, ’cause, get a load of this; all right,
If you get stopped by a cop in Amsterdam, it’s illegal for them to search you.
I mean that’s a right the cops in Amsterdam don’t have.
[JULES]
Oh, man, I’m goin’, that’s all there is to it. I’m fuckin’ goin’.
[VINCENT]
I know, baby, you’d dig it the most.. But you know what the funniest thing about Europe is?
[JULES]
What?
[VINCENT]
It’s the little differences. A lotta the same shit we got here,
they got there, but there they’re a little different.
[JULES]
Example ?
[VINCENT]
Alright, when you …. into a movie theatre in Amsterdam, you can buy beer.
And I don’t mean in a paper cup either. They give you a glass of beer
And in Paris, you can buy beer at MacDonald’s.
And you know what they call a Quarter Pounder with Cheese in Paris?
[JULES]
They don’t call it a Quarter Pounder with Cheese?
[VINCENT]
No, they got the metric system there, they wouldn’t know what the fuck a Quarter Pounder is.
[JULES]
What’d they call it?
[VINCENT]
They call it Royale with Cheese.
[JULES]
Royale with Cheese. What’d they call a Big Mac?
[VINCENT]
Big Mac’s a Big Mac, but they call it Le Big Mac.
[JULES]
Le big Mac ! Ahhaha, what do they call a Whopper?
[VINCENT]
I dunno, I didn’t go into a Burger King.
But you know what they put on french fries in Holland instead of ketchup?
[JULES]
What?
[VINCENT]
Mayonnaise.
[JULES]
Goddamn!

If dialogue like that doesn’t intrigue you, then I’m not sure what will.

Bruce Almighty

Image(The Jameson Rating: 75% A good slap stick comedy to be enjoyed, not critiqued. Many laughs will be had, and a great feel-good movie.) The existence of God is widely seen as the sort of topic that is avoided in almost all conversations. Out of fear that people will be disrespectful to personal beliefs, or that an angry dispute will begin, most stray from the topic. For the sake of a decent blog post, I will have to challenge that. When questioning the existence of a supreme being, there is another questions we must also ask ourselves. Is the existence of God based on evidence or belief? If you answer with evidence, then the question is a little trickier. It may very well be a fact that we cannot see, hear, or feel God, but we should never base conclusions on whether something is physical or not. If that were the case, then what would we say about wind, gravity, and love? Sure, there are factors that may contribute to the those theories, but could they just be results of something else we are incapable of seeing, or even just coincidences? We judge the reality of many of these based on theoretical belief, that just “makes sense”. To many, it just “makes sense” that a supreme being, like God, exists. These people are relying on the same sorts of beliefs that many Scientology-based people are relying on, and they are ridiculed for it. Despite it’s comical presence, the film “Bruce Almighty” starring Jim Carrey greatly questions the existence of God. The movie follows how someone like God is sometimes regarded as mean for allowing many of the tragedies like job loss, divorce, and death to occur. With so many devastations occurring, many people believe that there is no way someone like God could exist, but with a matter of hope and belief, He’s there.

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off

Image(The Jameson Rating: 100% One of my all-time favourite films. Little to be said, just incredible.) As opposed to my typical style of blog posts, where I write based on something we have discussed in class, I decided to have a bit of a twist this time. There are now 9 class days remaining, and as I’m sure my teacher may have noticed, I’ve been doing my fair share of procrastinating. With so much to do, so many projects and assignments that must be handed in by the end of the week, I did what any right-minded teenage student would do. I took some time off. I never really accomplished anything in doing so; but that was exactly the goal. From laying on the couch doing nothing, to taking a bike ride around town, I never once had “school” on my mind. It was phenomenal. I asked myself some very philosophical questions with all the free time. “If I don’t do any of my work. does it matter?” “Why do people do all this school work? Will it matter years from now?” “Should I have the normal, or raspberry frozen lemonade at Tim Hoton’s?”¬† My little vacation reminded me of a film I have always regarded as one of the greatest, John Hughes’ “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”. It is a coming-of-age classic that both entertains and captivates the audience. The movie inspires many to enjoy life now, after all, (if I can recite my absolute favourite line): “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”